One Direction _ _ Tue, Jul 30

One Direction HP PavilionTue, Jul 30 2013 7:30Many Tickets to View and Order at http://www.nationalticketdiscounts.com/ResultsTicket.aspx?evtid=1879486&event=One+Directionoriginal pre-renovation Yankee Stadium, albeit when they were on the playing field. The transfer of Monument Park from the old stadium to the new stadium began on November 10, 2008.[37] The first monuments were put in place on February 23, 2009.[38] Yankees pitcher Mariano Rivera requested that the Yankees reposition the team’s bullpen, as well as add a door to connect the Yankees’ bullpen to Monument Park, in order to allow access to it by Yankee relievers. The organization complied with his request Between the exterior perimeter wall and interior of the stadium is the “Great Hall”, a large concourse that runs between Gates 4 and 6.[34] With frieze originally lined the roof of the upper deck stands, but it was torn down during the 197475 renovations and replicated atop the wall beyond the bleachers.[31] The new stadium replicates the frieze in its original location along the upper deck stands.[31] Made of steel coated with zinc for rust protection, it is part of the support system for the cantilevers holding up the top deck and the lighting on the roof.[33] The wall beyond the bleacher seats is “cut out” to reveal the subway trains as they pass by, like they were in the original facility. A manually operated auxiliary scoreboard is built into the left and right field fences, in the Development and Management Plan”, and demanded that each theater in the district receive landmark designation.[15] Mayor Ed Koch ultimately reacted by creating a Theater Advisory Council, which included Papp.[11] In the 97th Congress (198182), on July 28, 1982, Representative Donald J. Mitchell and 13 co-sponsors introduced a bill entitled “H.R.6885, A bill to designate the Broadway/Times Square Theatre District in the City of New York as a national historic site”.[16] It would have required the U.S. to help preserve the district.[16] The bill was never enacted. Theater Subdistrict zoning [edit] In ed the “Theater Subdistrict Council”, LDC (TSC), a not-for-profit corporation, pursuant to the 1998 zoning regulation.[18] Funds are deposited into the Theater Subdistrict Fund.[18] The TSC administers the fund and allocates grants to promote new theater work and showcase Broadway’s role in American theater.[18] The New York City Zoning Resolution for special purpose districts, as amended on April 30, 2012, contains special regulations for the Theater Subdistrict, including the transfer of development rights, incentives for the rehabilitation of existing theaters, the creation of a theater council to promote theaters, and zoning and signage for theaters, and White Way is the name given to the section of Broadway which runs through the Theater District. New York did not have a significant theatre presence until about 1750, when actor-managers Walter Murray and Thomas Kean established a resident theatre company at the Theatre on Nassau Street, which held about 280 people. They presented Shakespeare plays and ballad operas such as The Beggar’s Opera.[3] In 1752, William Hallam sent a company of twelve actors from Britain to the colonies with his brother Lewis as their manager. They established a theatre in Williamsburg, Virginia and opened with The Merchant of Venice and The Anatomist. The company moved to New York in the summer of 1753, performing ballad operas and ballad-farces like Damon and Phillida. The Revolutionary War suspended theatre in New York, but thereafter theatre resumed in 1798, the year the 2,000-seat Park Theatre was built on Chatham Street (now called Park Row).[3] The Bowery Theatre opened in 1826,[4] followed by others. Blackface minstrel shows, a distinctly American form of entertainment, became popular in the 1830s, and especially so with the arrival of the Virginia Minstrels in the 1840s.[5] By the 1840s, P.T. Barnum was operating an entert Sunday evening through Tuesday evening as their weekend. The Tony award presentation ceremony is usually held on a Sunday evening in June to fit this schedule. In recent years some shows have moved their Tuesday show time an hour earlier to 7:00 p.m.[22] The rationale for the move was that since fewer tourists take in shows midweek then the Tuesday attendance in particular depends on the local audience. The earlier curtain makes it possible for suburban patrons to get home by a reasonable hour after the show. Some shows, especially those produced by Disney, change their performance schedules fairly frequently depending on the season. This is done in prepared to commit to has gone down. Time was that a producer would require a minimum commitment from his star of six months, and perhaps a year; now, the 14-week run is the norm.”[25] The minimum size of the Broadway orchestra is governed by an agreement with the musicians union (Local 802, American Federation of Musicians) and The Broadway League. For example, the agreement specifies the minimum size of the orchestra at the Minskoff Theatre to be 18, at the Music Box Theatre to be 9.[26] Producers and theatre owners Most Broadway producers and theatre owners are members of The Broadway League (formerly “The League of American Theatres and planned limited engagement runs may, after critical acclaim or box office success, extend their engagements or convert to open-ended runs. This was the case with 2007′s August: Osage County, 2009′s God of Carnage, and 2012′s Newsies. Historically, musicals on Broadway tend to have longer runs than “straight” (i.e. non-musical) plays. On January 9, 2006, The Phantom of the Opera at the Majestic Theatre became the longest running Broadway musical, with 7,486 performances, overtaking Cats.[27] Audience Attending a Broadway show is a common tourist activity in New York. The TKTS booths sell same-day tickets (and in ce as high as possible.[28] According to The Broadway League, total Broadway attendance was 12.13 million in calendar year 2011 compared to 12.11 million in 2010.[2] The Broadway League also reports that approximately 62% of all Broadway tickets were purchased by tourists in the 20102011 season.[29] By way of comparison, London’s West End theatre reported total attendance of 14.3 million for major commercial and grant-aided theatres in central London for 2009.[30] Off-Broadway and US tours The classification of theatres is governed by language in Actors’ Equity Association contracts. To be eligible for a Tony, a production must be in a house with 500 the Broadway National Tour, which travels to theatres in major cities across the country. Sometimes when a show closes on Broadway, the entire production, with most if not all of the original cast intact, is relaunched as a touring company, hence the name “Broadway National Tour”. Some shows may even have several touring companies out at a time, whether the show is still running in New York or not, with many companies “sitting down” in other major cities for their own extended runs. Smaller cities may attract national touring companies, but for shorter periods of time. Or they may even be serviced by “bus and truck” tours. These are scaled down versions of the larger, national touring productions, historically acquiring their name because the casts generally traveled by bus instead of by air, while the sets and equipment traveled by truck. Tours of this type, which frequently feature a reduced physical production to accommodate smaller venues and tighter schedules, often run for weeks rather than months. Some will even play “split weeks”, which are half a week in one town and the second half in another. On occasion, they will also play “one-nighters”. The production values, while generally still good, are usually less lavish seven-story ceilings, the Great Hall features more than 31,000 square feet (2,900 m2) of retail space and is lined with 20 banners of past and present Yankees superstars.[34] The Great Hall features a 5-by-383-foot (1.5 by 117 m) LED (light-emitting diode) ribbon display as well as a 25′ by 36′ LED video display above the entrance to the ballpark from Daktronics, a company in Brookings, South Dakota Many design elements of the ballpark’s interior are inspired by the original Yankee Stadium. The roof of the new facility features a replica of the frieze that was a trademark of the previous ballpark.[31] In the original Yankee Stadium, a copper same locations it existed in the pre-renovation iteration of the original Yankee Stadium.[31] New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner began campaigning for the building of a new stadium in the 1980s, even alleging unsafe conditions around the original Yankee Stadium despite the possibility that such statements could discourage attendance at his own team’s games. Yankees ownership allegedly planned to move the team across the Hudson River to New Jersey. The Yankees also considered moving to the West Side of Manhattan, which was where the proposed West Side Stadium would later be considered for the New York Jets and the city’s bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics.[14][15] New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani had already been instrumental in the construction of taxpayer-funded minor league baseball facilities MCU Park for the Mets’ minor league Brooklyn Cyclones and Richmond County Bank Ballpark for the Staten Island Yankees. Shortly before leaving office in December 2001, he announced “tentative agreements” for both the New York Yankees and New York Mets to build new stadiums. Of $1.5 billion sought for the stadiums, city and state taxpayers would pick up half the tab for construction, $800 million, along with $390 million on extra transportation.[16] The plan also said that the teams would be allowed to keep would have to pay for the stadium themselves. The proposal for the current stadium was unveiled by the Yankees in 2004. The team scrapped plans to build a retractable roof, saving $200 million in construction costs.[18] Construction [edit] The stadium under construction in 2007 (top), and the completed venue next to the remains of the former facility in 2010 (bottom) Groundbreaking ceremonies for the stadium took place on August 16, 2006, the 58th anniversary of Babe Ruth’s death, with Steinbrenner, Bloomberg in the previous Yankee Stadium during the 2007 and 2008 seasons while their new home stadium was built across the street In the Spring of 1982, contains a list of theaters that qualify for special provisions in the regulations.[19] Boundaries [edit] The City of New York defines the subdistrict for zoning purposes to extend from 40th Street to 57th Street and from Sixth Avenue to Eighth Avenue, with an additional area west of Eighth Avenue from 42nd Street to 45th Street.[20] Google Maps indicates 52nd Street rather than 57th to be its northern boundary.[21] The Times Square Alliance, a Business Improvement District organization dedicated to improving the Theater District, defines the district as an irregularly shaped area within the bounding box of 40th Street, 6th Ave, 53rd Street, and 9th Ave.[22] The Great of Venice and The Anatomist. The company moved to New York in the summer of 1753, performing ballad operas and ballad-farces like Damon and Phillida. The Revolutionary War suspended theatre in New York, but thereafter theatre resumed in 1798, the year the 2,000-seat Park Theatre was built on Chatham Street (now called Park Row).[3] The Bowery Theatre opened in 1826,[4] followed by others. Blackface minstrel shows, a distinctly American form of entertainment, became popular in the 1830s, and especially so with the arrival of the Virginia Minstrels in the 1840s.[5] By the 1840s, P.T. Barnum was operating an entert Sunday evening through Tuesday evening as their weekend. The Tony award presentation ceremony is usually held on a Sunday evening in June to fit this schedule. In recent years some shows have moved their Tuesday show time an hour earlier to 7:00 p.m.[22] The rationale for the move was that since fewer tourists take in shows midweek then the Tuesday attendance in particular depends on the local audience. The earlier curtain makes it possible for suburban patrons to get home by a reasonable hour after the show. Some shows, especially those produced by Disney, change their performance schedules fairly frequently depending on the season. This is done in stars who committed to working on a show for a year, as Nathan Lane has for The Addams Family. In 2010, some theater heavyweights like Mr. Lane were not even nominated; instead, several Tony Awards were given for productions that were always intended to be short-timers on Broadway, given that many of their film-star performers had to move on to other commitments.[24] According to Mark Shenton, “One of the biggest changes to the commercial theatrical landscapeon both sides of the Atlanticover the past decade or so is that sightings of big star names turning out to do plays has gone up; but the runs they are Producers”), a trade organization that promotes Broadway theatre as a whole, negotiates contracts with the various theatrical unions and agreements with the guilds, and co-administers the Tony Awards with the American Theatre Wing, a service organization. While the League and the theatrical unions are sometimes at loggerheads during those periods when new contracts are being negotiated, they also cooperate on many projects and events designed to promote professional theatre in New York. The three non-profit theatre companies with Broadway theatres (Lincoln Center Theater, Manhattan Theatre Club, and Roundabout Theatre Company) belong to the League ries a varied degree of financial risk. Shows do not necessarily have to make a profit immediately. If they are making their “nut” (weekly operating expenses), or are losing money at a rate which the producers consider acceptable, they may continue to run in the expectation that, eventually, they will pay back their initial costs and become profitable. In some borderline situations, producers may ask that royalties be temporarily reduced or waived, or even that performerswith the permission of their unionstake reduced salaries, in order to prevent a show from closing. Theatre owners, who are not generally profit participants in most productions, may waive or reduce seats or more and in the Theater District, which criteria define Broadway theatre. Off Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows often provide a more experimental, challenging and intimate performance than is possible in the larger Broadway theatres. Some Broadway shows, however, such as the musicals Hair, Little Shop of Horrors, Spring Awakening, Next to Normal, Rent, Avenue Q, and In the Heights, began their runs Off Broadway and later transferred onto Broadway, seeking to replicate their intimate experience in a larger theatre. After, or even during, successful runs in Broadway theatres, producers often remount their productions with new casts and crew for tours. These are scaled down versions of the larger, national touring productions, historically acquiring their name because the casts generally traveled by bus instead of by air, while the sets and equipment traveled by truck. Tours of this type, which frequently feature a reduced physical production to accommodate smaller venues and tighter schedules, often run for weeks rather than months. Some will even play “split weeks”, which are half a week in one town and the second half in another. On occasion, they will also play “one-nighters”. The production values, while generally still good, are usually less lavish the Broadway National Tour, which travels to theatres in major cities across the country. Sometimes when a show closes on Broadway, the entire production, with most if not all of the original cast intact, is relaunched as a touring company, hence the name “Broadway National Tour”. Some shows may even have several touring companies out at a time, whether the show is still running in New York or not, with many companies “sitting down” in other major cities for their own extended runs. Smaller cities may attract national touring companies, but for shorter periods of time. Or they may even be serviced by “bus and truck” than the typical Broadway National tour or national touring production and the actors, while still members of the actor’s union, are compensated under a different, less lucrative, union contract. The Touring Broadway Awards, presented by The Broadway League, honor excellence in touring Broadway, Broadway productions and artists are honored by the annual Antoinette Perry Awards (commonly called the “Tony Awards, or “Tony”) which are given by the American Theatre Wing and the Broadway League, and which were first presented in 1947.[31] The Tony is Broadway’s most prestigious award, comparable to the Academy Awards for Hollywood filmplanned limited engagement runs may, after critical acclaim or box office success, extend their engagements or convert to open-ended runs. This was the case with 2007′s August: Osage County, 2009′s God of Carnage, and 2012′s Newsies. Historically, musicals on Broadway tend to have longer runs than “straight” (i.e. non-musical) plays. On January 9, 2006, The Phantom of the Opera at the Majestic Theatre became the longest running Broadway musical, with 7,486 performances, overtaking Cats.[27] Audience Attending a Broadway show is a common tourist activity in New York. The TKTS booths sell same-day tickets (and in ce rtain cases next-day matinee tickets) for many Broadway and Off-Broadway shows at a discount of 25%, 35%, or 50%. But you cannot purchase some of tickets for a very popular show such as The Lion King and Wicked from TKTS in 2013 the present. The TKTS booths are located in Duffy Square, in Times Square, in Lower Manhattan, and in Brooklyn. This service run by Theatre Development Fund makes seeing a show in New York more affordable. Many Broadway theatres also offer special student rates, same-day “rush” or “lottery” tickets, or standing-room tickets to help ensure that their theatres are as full, and their “grosses” of Resident Theatres and have contracts with the theatrical unions which are negotiated separately from the other Broadway theatre and producers. (Disney also negotiates apart from the League, as did Livent before it closed down its operations.) However, generally, shows that play in any of the Broadway houses are eligible for Tony Awards (see below). The majority of Broadway theatres are owned or managed by three organizations: the Shubert Organization, a for-profit arm of the non-profit Shubert Foundation, which owns seventeen theatres (it recently retained full ownership of the Music Box from the Irving Berlin Estate); The ries a varied degree of financial risk. Shows do not necessarily have to make a profit immediately. If they are making their “nut” (weekly operating expenses), or are losing money at a rate which the producers consider acceptable, they may continue to run in the expectation that, eventually, they will pay back their initial costs and become profitable. In some borderline situations, producers may ask that royalties be temporarily reduced or waived, or even that performerswith the permission of their unionstake reduced salaries, in order to prevent a show from closing. Theatre owners, who are not generally profit participants in most productions, may waive or reduce order to maximize access to their target audience. Personnel Both musicals and stage plays on Broadway often rely on casting well-known performers in leading roles to draw larger audiences or bring in new audience members to the theatre. Actors from movies and television are frequently cast for the revivals of Broadway shows or are used to replace actors leaving a cast. There are still, however, performers who are primarily stage actors, spending most of their time “on the boards”, and appearing in television and in screen roles only secondarily. As Patrick Healy of The New York Times noted, Broadway once had many homegrown prepared to commit to has gone down. Time was that a producer would require a minimum commitment from his star of six months, and perhaps a year; now, the 14-week run is the norm.”[25] The minimum size of the Broadway orchestra is governed by an agreement with the musicians union (Local 802, American Federation of Musicians) and The Broadway League. For example, the agreement specifies the minimum size of the orchestra at the Minskoff Theatre to be 18, at the Music Box Theatre to be 9.[26] Producers and theatre owners Most Broadway producers and theatre owners are members of The Broadway League (formerly “The League of American Theatres and eans who appeared in New York in this era were Henry Irving, Tommaso Salvini, Fanny Davenport, and Charles Fechter. After the lean years of the Great Depression, Broadway theatre had entered a golden age with the blockbuster hit Oklahoma!, in 1943, which ran for 2,212 performances. According to John Kenrick writing of Broadway musicals, “Every season saw new stage musicals send songs to the top of the charts. Public demand, a booming economy and abundant creative talent kept Broadway hopping. To this day, the shows of the 1950s form the core of the musical theatre repertory.”[15] Kenrick notes that “the late to May) there were 59 productions (fifteen were revivals).[19][20] In the twenties there were 7080 theaters but by 1969 there were 36 left.[21] Broadway today Schedule Although there are some exceptions, generally shows with open-ended runs have evening performances Tuesday through Saturday with a 7:00 p.m. or 8:00 p.m. “curtain”. The afternoon “matinĂ©e” performances are at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays and at 3:00 p.m. on Sundays. This makes it an eight-performance week. On this schedule most shows do not play on Monday and the shows and theatres are said to be day.[22][23] The actors and the crew in these shows tend to regard White Way is the name given to the section of Broadway which runs through the Theater District. New York did not have a significant theatre presence until about 1750, when actor-managers Walter Murray and Thomas Kean established a resident theatre company at the Theatre on Nassau Street, which held about 280 people. They presented Shakespeare plays and ballad operas such as The Beggar’s Opera.[3] In 1752, William Hallam sent a company of twelve actors from Britain to the colonies with his brother Lewis as their manager. They established a theatre in Williamsburg, Virginia and opened with The Merchant of Venice and The Anatomist. The company moved to New York in the summer of 1753, performing ballad operas and ballad-farces like Damon and Phillida. The Revolutionary War suspended theatre in New York, but thereafter theatre resumed in 1798, the year the 2,000-seat Park Theatre was built on Chatham Street (now called Park Row).[3] The Bowery Theatre opened in 1826,[4] followed by others. Blackface minstrel shows, a distinctly American form of entertainment, became popular in the 1830s, and especially so with the arrival of the Virginia Minstrels in the 1840s.[5] By the 1840s, P.T. Barnum was operating an entert Joe Papp, the theatrical producer and director who established The Public Theater, led the “Save the Theatres” campaign.[9] It was a not-for-profit group supported by the Actors Equity union, to save the theater buildings in the neighborhood from demolition by monied Manhattan development interests.[10][11][12][13] Papp provided resources, recruited a publicist and celebrated actors, and provided audio, lighting, and technical crews for the effort.[11] Save the Theatres supported establishing the Theater District as a registered historic district.[14][15] In December 1983, Save the Theatres prepared “The Broadway Theater District, a Preservation January 2001, New York City Planning Chairman Joseph Rose and Corporation Counsel Michael Hess announced in a press release that the New York Appellate Division, First Department, upheld the validity of the 1998 Theater Subdistrict zoning regulations, which permit the sale of air rights from the Broadway theaters to sites in the Theater Subdistrict, “between 40th and 57th Streets and Sixth and Eighth Avenues”.[17] The New York City Depart of City Planning press release stated: “The concentration of over 40 Broadway theaters makes the Theater District one of the most well-known areas in the world.”[17] New York City creat all parking revenues, which state officials had already said they wanted to keep to compensate the state for building new garages for the teams.[17] The teams would keep 96% of ticket revenues and 100% of all other revenues, not pay sales tax or property tax on the stadium, and would get low-cost electricity from the state of New York.[17] Business officials criticized the plan as giving too much money to successful teams with little reason to move to a different city.[17] Michael Bloomberg, who succeeded Giuliani as mayor in 2002, called the former mayor’s agreements “corporate welfare” and exercised the would have to pay for the stadium themselves. The proposal for the current stadium was unveiled by the Yankees in 2004. The team scrapped plans to build a retractable roof, saving $200 million in construction costs.[18] Construction [edit] The stadium under construction in 2007 (top), and the completed venue next to the remains of the former facility in 2010 (bottom) Groundbreaking ceremonies for the stadium took place on August 16, 2006, the 58th anniversary of Babe Ruth’s death, with Steinbrenner, Bloomberg in the previous Yankee Stadium during the 2007 and 2008 seasons while their new home stadium was built across the street In the Spring of 1982, cUP{27}{28}nBpezp8lFx1ztyTv

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